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The pianist Konstantin Semilakovs was born in 1984 in Riga (Latvia).

 

He is laureate of the First Prize of the International Piano Competition in Porto (Portugal), prizewinner of the Competition for Young Pianists Ettlingen (Germany) and First Prize winner of the national music competition "Jugend musiziert".

 

Konstantin Semilakovs has performed in recital and chamber music concerts at the International Beethoven Festival Bonn, the Frankfurt Musikmesse, the Braunschweig Classix Festival, the Schleswig-Holstein and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Music Festivals. In 2010 he debuted with the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra and Beethoven's Choral Fantasy at the Meistersingerhalle.

 

Konstantin Semilakovs was awarded the Klassikpreis of West German Broadcasting (WDR) and City of Münster, the Hans Sikorski Memorial Award, and the Prize of Ingolstadt Concert Association.

 

In 2004 he commenced his piano studies with Wolfgang Manz at the Nuremberg University of Music and graduated 2008 with a diploma in music pedagogy and 2009 with artist's diploma. In 2011 he received his Meisterklasse diploma with distinction. 2011-2012 Konstantin Semilakovs continued his piano studies with Michael Wladkowski at École Normale de Musique Alfred Cortot in Paris and graduated with the Diplôme Supérieur d'Exécution.

 

From 2011 to 2018 he taught at the Nuremberg University of Music, 2013-2017 at the College of Catholic Church Music and Music Education Regensburg and 2016-2018 at the University Mozarteum in Salzburg.

 

Since 2018, Konstantin Semilakovs is professor of piano at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna.

 

In addition to his artistic and pedagogical activities, Konstantin Semilakovs is researching the phenomenon of synaesthesia and 'colour' in classical music of the 20th century (especially in the compositions of Alexander Scriabin and Olivier Messiaen) within his doctoral programme at the University of St Andrews. The main focus of his work is the relation between overtone-based harmony and tonality, cross-modal linkage, and perception of consonance and harmony.